11.06.2009

 

1896








What was this spent on in 1896?


  4 comments


Comments:
Two-dollars-a-ton hay;
Two-cent-a-pound hogs;
Five-cent-a-pound butter;
Ten-dollars-a-head mules;
Ten-cent-a-bushel potatoes;
Two-dollars-and-a-half horses;

and never enough to make ends meet.


 
The excerpt came from this protest piece of 1896 from the "PEOPLE'S PARTY"

The continuance of the "present gold standard" means:
Ruin;
Rage;
Riots;
Debts;
Crime;
Strikes;
Tramps;
Poverty;
Mortgages;
Hard times;
Sheriff sales;
More panics;
Less churches;
Close factories;
Business failures;
Fewer preachers;
More soup houses;
Homeless families;
A debauched ballot;
Twenty-cent wheat;
Less improvements;
Uneducated children;
Suffering and misery;
Crowded alms houses;
A dearth of marriages;
Two-dollars-a-ton hay;
Idleness and stagnation;
Two-cent-a-pound hogs;
Five-cent-a-pound butter;
Ten-dollars-a-head mules;
Falling prices for all product;
Hungry women and children;
Ten-cent-a-bushel potatoes;
Pauper prices for vegetables;
Two-dollars-and-a-half horses;
A contraction of the currency;
A dear dollar and a cheap man;
Twenty-five-cents-a-day labor;
Half clothed women and children;
Coxey armies marching through the land.
--People's Party Paper, 16 October 1896 (reprinted from Times-Democrat, Idaho)


 
That is beautiful. It turns out all they wanted was a motor car.


 
Ford sold his first Quadricycle for $200 that first year. He would build two more quadricycles: one in 1899, and another in 1901. He eventually bought his first one back for $6.
if a horse was selling fo $2, $2900 bought the cars!


 
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